For an alphabetical list of all works, click Here, or click All Voicings in the menu bar. If you have any questions or requests, please use the contact form to send me an email.

 

The following scores are available through online publishers as well as from the composer in some instances. See Publisher information on Contact page for publisher links, or click the underlined publisher name below, which will take you to a list of my works. Not all works from a publisher's catalog are listed on this web page. In the following alphabetical web page list, the abbreviations refer to the following publishers:

 

JWP - J. W. Pepper

SMP - SheetMusicPlus

YRM - Yelton Rhodes Music

SPC - Self-published by composer

 

Click the underlined publisher abbreviations (JWP, SMP, and YRM) that are associated with each piece, and you'll be linked to the piece itself on each publisher site. 

 

Perusal score downloads are available for selected SPC pieces. Look for NEW → , which highlights the new downloads.

- D -

 

Dona eis requiem

JWP and SMP | $3.00 | SA or treble voices (also available in TB and SATB) with piano  | settings of three sections from the requiem mass: Pie Jesu, Agnus Dei, and Lux Aeterna | sound files are available on the publisher web pages

 

Suitable for concert or service use. A modern setting, tonal, and very accessible for singers and audience or congregation.

 

- F -

 

Four Songs of the Seasons

 SPC | Contact composer for download availability |  $3.75 | Two-part treble voices and piano in a set of four songs |  YouTube link to fourth movement, Winter Circle, is HERE

 

Each song explores the sights and sounds of a particular season. Very suitable for concerts year-round where two seasons can be programmed in the winter concert (fall and winter) and then for the spring concert (spring and summer). The two-part writing is accessible for grades 3 - 7. More advanced groups can sing optional harmonies for the endings in the fall and winter pieces and an optional solo is available in the fall piece. Lyrics in the spring piece can be customized by the instructor or as a class exercise.

 

- S -

 

The Ships of Yule

JWP and SMP | $2.00 | Treble voices or SA (also available in SATB, SSA, SAB, TB, and TTBB) |  sound files are available on the publisher web pages

 

This setting of Bliss Carman's poem, "The Ships of Yule," is lively and rhythmic and contains elements of a traditional sea chantey. The music is tonal with lots of harmonic color and forays into related keys. The poem refers to Yule, and so the piece is appropriate for Christmas or winter celebrations. 

 

- W -

 

Winter Circle

from Four Songs of the Seasons

JWP and SMP | $2.00 | Two-part treble voices (or SA) and piano | YouTube link is HERE

 

Comments by a director for a recent performance: "Working on your piece was a great experience for me and the singers. It presented good vocal and musical challenges for this age group, all the while being beautiful and captivating--they were always willing to keep working on it!" 

Here's a link to an interview with Sara Boos, Northwest Girlchoir director, and myself, a "behind the scenes" look at the work and its inspiration, and Sara's thoughts about the piece:

 

Behind the Scenes: "Winter Circle" by Don Skirvin 


Winter Circle is evocative and harmonically rich. The piano plays a constantly moving pattern while the voices float above it, like the stars in the Winter Circle itself. The lyrics consist of short descriptions of each star based on one or more of the following factors: color, size, and brightness of the star; constellation in which the star is located; zodiacal sign star reference; reference to the star in mythology or in another historical reference such as the Dendera zodiac. To "decode" the lyrics, notice that the color always refers to the color of the star itself and may include another attribute. As an example, Aldebaran is referred to as "the fiery eye of the Bull." It's "fiery" because the star color is red. And it's the eye of Taurus in the constellation of the same name, hence the reference to the "eye of the Bull." The other lyrics can be decoded in a similar fashion. Additional information is available from the composer.